Podcast: Why Geoffrey Moore’s Crossing the Chasm is a Must-Read for Ambitious Startup Founders

Why Geoffrey Moore's Crossing the Chasm is a Must-Read for Ambitious Startup Founders

Geoffrey Moore’s book ‘Crossing the Chasm‘ identifies key players in product consumption by using a distinction. This distinction is important because it helps business owners choose what to prioritize. In this podcast, you get to hear about how Geoffrey Moore took inspiration from another book.

Here’s a great Starting Greatness podcast episode from Mike Maples Jr. at Floodgate interviewing Geoffrey Moore about the book.

Geoffrey Moore on Crossing the Chasm: Marketing and Selling High-Tech Products Book for Startup Founders

Moore classified people who are after his products as enthusiasts and visionaries. He says that enthusiasts are the first ones to have knowledge of the product and Moore discusses the important role they serve in product consumption. Visionaries play an even bigger role in how a product can become a default in public eyes.

He also discusses the broader categories of early adopters and pragmatists. He goes into detail about how these two play an important role. Enthusiasts and visionaries fall under early adopters, while pragmatists are usually the most difficult part of the audience. He talks about disruption and how this is the first thing pragmatists notice. 

Moore goes in-depth into pragmatist territory and shows a very specific type of pragmatists that are the key players to transitioning from early adopters and pragmatists. Pragmatists in pain are the pseudo gray area that will help cross the chasm.

Anyone who has practiced entrepreneurship knows that it’s important to form functional business relationships. Geoffrey Moore focuses on finding the specific niche of people that share the same belief that product creators have. These people will usually be the pragmatists in pain. Early adopters do not have these beliefs as it is already a fact for them and do not need convincing that a product is great.

These unique interactions with different types of customers are also indicative of the stage and the development of the product. Taking cues from the customers, (with importance on enthusiasts early on) helps avoid critical factors that could possibly convince a pragmatist in pain not to invest in a product. 

Moore also talks about how a 4-gear approach to business is crucial. He further explains that it’s more useful to focus on lagging factors than trying to be excellent in several areas at once. Find out more on how Geoffrey Moore classifies work culture and worker cultures into two and how these affect the performance of an entrepreneur or an organization as a whole.

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